Feminism and Makeup

The Year of women
It is the year of the woman; 100 years have passed since the suffragettes took their stand and protested and campaigned to get women the right to vote. Equality for women has progressed rapidly due to the brave actions of people who believe we should not be discriminated against due to our gender.
However, gender equality is still a taboo with people arguing that, despite protests and legislation to protect people from being treated unfairly, it still exists. Feminists would argue that there are still many areas of life that are male-dominated and views within society promote a male-dominated world. Louise Pentland from A Sprinkle of Glitter spoke in-depth about how marriage is still dominated by male-biased tradition in her video. I also spoke of how fairy tales have pushed an unequal view of relationships and promoted male-dominated stereotypes.

Does feminism breed empowerment or hatred?
The term feminist has been brought to the forefront in 2018 with ‘The Year of The Woman’. The word itself can conjure up many images; for some, it stands for a strong, independent woman who can take charge and make a change within society, for others, it summons the image of men hating, outspoken individuals who deliberately use anarchistic tactics to get a reaction.
During the times of the suffragette movement, red lipstick was used as a sign of protest. At the time red lipstick was frowned upon due to its association with ‘ladies of the night’. At the time makeup had gone out of fashion and women were discouraged from wearing it. Due to the suffragette movement, the wearing of makeup was resurrected and was the height of fashion in the 1920’s. From that point on, makeup has been a prominent feature of our society, with women like Coco Chanel making it the ultimate sign of sophistication.

The arguments against women wearing makeup
We do not need makeup, it is a luxury that can be afforded to us due to our social climate. In terms of basic necessity, we need food, water and safety so many people could argue that we do not need to indulge our time painting our faces.
Some feminists would argue that putting on makeup, especially to attract the attention of men is wrong as men do not do a similar thing to compensate. Feminists would argue that too much emphasis has been placed on women ‘making an effort’ whereas men just simply ‘turn up’ as they are.
Also, the beauty industry feeds into women’s insecurities by telling them they need longer lashes, a bigger pout and flawless skin. The continual pressure on women to ‘fit in’ with what the media deems to be acceptable for a woman only further fuels the feminist viewpoint that we should not wear makeup and embrace our natural beauty.
The argument for embracing the natural beauty of women has been running through the feminist movement for a long time. Feminists will argue that women are just as beautiful without makeup and should not feel the need to hide it under a false mask. Makeup has often been forced upon women in many professions who insist on having it as part of their dress code. Air Stewardesses are often the main victim of this and some airlines even dictate what shade of lipstick they have to wear while male stewardesses do not need to follow the same rules.

The reasons we should wear makeup
Makeup is a way of expressing yourself. You can use it to define your own individual identity within the world after all the world would be boring if everyone was the same. It is also a way to express your creative side and even your mood. I love the way that people can use makeup to express their own personal style and unique personality.
People have the freedom of choice and so if they choose to wear makeup, whether they are women or men, they are free to do it. If wearing makeup does not hurt other people then it is their choice how much they wear and should not be discriminated because of that choice.
It is also argued that makeup has been used throughout history by both men and women as a sign of wealth and power. From the Ancient Egyptian’s, the Elizabethans to the glam rock and punk eras, makeup has been used by both men and women to make a mark on the world.
Another viewpoint is one of self-care and building confidence within an individual. If putting makeup on makes somebody feel happier, then that is a positive. The power of makeup has been used by many people to help them face the day and overcome their low self-esteem. It is also an act of self-care that can help improve a person’s mental health and wellbeing, the time you take for yourself is precious time and shows you are ‘worth it’.
Mrs T’s opinions on things
I have seen both sides of this argument. I spent five years not owning or wearing a scrap of makeup. I rediscovered my love for makeup three years ago and have never looked back. Makeup has boosted my confidence, get in touch with my creative side and define my own unique identity. I love the power the makeup has, it is transformative.
I choose to wear make-up for me and nobody else. I do not believe that society should dictate whether you were makeup or not. If wearing makeup makes you happy and more confident in yourself whether you’re a woman or a man then just let it be and respect that decision and freedom of choice. Do not let anyone dictate to you what you should and should not do you are your own special person and whatever makes you happy is best for you and for the world around you.

What is your opinion on feminism within makeup I would love to know your thoughts in the comments?

Ciao for now beauties xx

22 Comments Add yours

  1. wraemsanders says:

    I love makeup and my 10 year old daughter does too. I know I don’t need it but it’s my form of self expression. I love the colors.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. lifewithmrst says:

      I completely agree with you; I do feel like some things in the beauty industry needs re-addressing to encompass the idea of equality. I feel like some big beauty brands use it to make women feel insecure.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. wraemsanders says:

        Absolutely true. I think some brands tend to know tender spots and play on them

        Liked by 1 person

      2. lifewithmrst says:

        I think most main stream brands do that.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Ellustar says:

    Reblogged this on Ellustar Fashion.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Nathalia says:

    There is definitely room for makeup in feminism—and lots of it! As you said, makeup is channel of personal expression, which I totally agree with. Ultimately, feminism is about having the freedom to choose to either wear makeup or not, without being criticized for it or told that, as a woman, you should do one or the other.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. lifewithmrst says:

      I completely agree; makeup is so empowering but also choosing not to wear it is just as good.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Michelle says:

    Totally agree with you. I didn’t start wearing makeup until college and was a little wary that I started because of pressure from society. But I decided I didn’t care and kept playing with makeup anyway!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. lifewithmrst says:

      I’m glad that you do not feel the pressure that society sometimes has, keep doing what makes you feel good.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Lori says:

    Think makeup is an art for or just a way to feel more put-together. Personally, I don’t wear it daily, but enjoy seeing others having fun with it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. lifewithmrst says:

      It’s great that you feel comfortable with or without makeup. I feel like often women feel shamed into wearing it

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I Totally Agreed with you – Makeup is a way of expressing yourself and a channel of personal expression.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Suanlian Tangpua says:

    I totally agreed with you – Makeup is a way of expressing yourself and a channel of expressing one’s personality.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. lifewithmrst says:

      Thank you for stopping by I am glad that you agree with using makeup as a creative channel.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Katy says:

    How about just wearing makeup because you enjoy it and you like the way it makes you look? And how about if people who don’t like it just do what they do and don’t use it if it doesn’t suit? Honestly, this obsession with trying to force women into boxes really gets old and boring!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. lifewithmrst says:

      I completely agree but unfortunately these boxes still exist and the beauty industry needs to take note and change because they often shame women into feeling like they need to wear it.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. sorgulalogos says:

    Maybe I am one of the people who think, at least, modern feminists over-react to society in a way that they draw reaction from the society. When I say “society”, i basically mean the structure that is made of simpler pieces like “families”, “couples”…etc. As for your topic, I personally realized that almost %95 of women around me feel like they have to wear make-up because they think, otherwise, everyone around them would blame them for being “dowdy”.

    I think, this perception and “Make-up to be free” concept are created intentionally by certain corporations and most of them have businesses in the field of cosmetics. I don’t think it is a coincidence that, for example, stocking selling or let’s say, lipstick selling corporations makes discounts for women on certain days, like international women’s day.

    Again, I think, it is one of the biggest marketing strategies that corporations have been using, combining the idea of “women freedom” with “cosmetics”. Of course, every individual is free to wear make-up, but none needs to wear make up in order to be free.

    Anyway, thank you for sharing your opinions. This issue has been one of the issues we discuss with my friends so it is good to know a woman’s idea on this issue.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. lifewithmrst says:

      Thank you for your comment, I had not considered this argument. I do think beauty companies target the insecurities of women and that must stop doing that. The stereotype of being dowdy without makeup maybe needs to be challenged too.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I think that the whole point of feminism is for women to make the choice for themselves as to how they want to decorate. They can wear makeup to attract people if that’s what they want to do, they can wear makeup for themselves, or they can choose not to wear any makeup at all. The whole point of it is having the ability to choose without social stigma.
    Also, I’ve nominated you for the Three Day Quote Challenge 🙂 dreadedscribe.wordpress.com/2018/04/11/three-day-three-quote-challenge-day-1/

    Liked by 2 people

    1. lifewithmrst says:

      I understand that but there are some very far end feminists that argue that there is still so much stigma around the wearing of makeup when men are not encouraged to in the mainstream. I know that men wearing makeup is changing the way we look at makeup but ultimately the beauty industry targets women.
      Thank you for the nomination, I will check it out.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Far end feminists are like any other far end groups—just extreme. They don’t necessarily represent what is the accurate scope of the movement they think they’re portray and in some instances do more harm than good. I know a lady who expresses a lot of feminist ideas but will always stop herself and say, “I’m sorry, I sound like a feminist.”
        I’m so thrilled the beauty industry is beginning to Include men, even though it’s a very slow process. I think there are some delightfully healthy outcomes that will result in it.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. I believe feminism boils down to women making their own decisions for themselves and for them not to be criticised for that – whether that is wearing make-up or not! So I do agree with you, it’s just a shame some make-up brands and companies can capitalise off women’s insecurities and meeting an ‘ideal’ image.

    Like

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